Biscuits

 Ingredients

  • 3 cups flour
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 4 t baking powder
  • 1 1/2 t honey
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 egg
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Combine flour, salt, and baking powder.
  3. Cut the cold butter into the flour until it resembles meal.
  4. Stir in the rest of the ingredients just until well incorporated.
  5. Roll out the dough to desired thickness and cut out your biscuits.
  6. Bake them on a cookie sheet or cast iron skillet for 13-17 minutes removing when biscuits are golden brown and fluffy.
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Ricotta Cake with Blueberries

INGREDIENTS:

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup granulated sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
3 large eggs
1 1/2 cups whole milk ricotta
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 stick unsalted butter, melted and cooled
1/4 cup blueberries

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat an oven to 350 degrees.

Spray a 9-inch cake pan with non-stick cooking spray. In a large bowl, combine the first four ingredients. In another large bowl combine eggs, ricotta, vanilla extract, and butter. Slowly combine the dry ingredients with the wet ingredients. Once combined, gently fold in the blueberries, careful not break them. Pour batter into cake pan and bake for about 60 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from oven to cool before slicing and dusting with confectioners sugar.

Summer Vacation Day 43 – Orange Mead and Orange Cake

orange

 

Orange Cake – see recipe here

Orange Mead*
makes 1 gallon

  • 2 1/2 pounds raw honey
  • 1 Large orange –  wash cut to fit for later removal from the gallon jug
  • 1 small handful of raisins
  • 1 teaspoon bread yeast  – dies off quickly so the mead stays sweeter
  • Balance water to one gallon

Process:

  1. Sterilize a 1 gallon carboy, airlock and funnel
  2. Dissolve the honey in warm water and put into the carboy
  3. Add the orange and raising
  4. Top off with cold water to 3 inches from the top.
  5. Shake the jug with top on, for aeration.
  6. Add 1 teaspoon of bread yeast.
  7. Install water airlock and put it in dark place.

After 2 months or so it will slow down to a stop and clear. Then you can siphon it off and bottle

*(adapted from a recipe by Joe Mattioli)

Summer Vacation Day 5 – Blueberry Muffins

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 c flourIMG_1664
  • 1 T baking powder
  • ½ t salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 4 T melted butter
  • 1 c sour cream
  • 1 c fresh blueberries:
  1. Preheat the oven to 350.
  2. Combine the flour, baking powder and salt in a medium bowl and set aside.
  3. Whisk the egg until well-combined and light-yellow. Add the sugar and whisk until creamed.
  4. Slowly add the melted butter, combining well after each addition.
  5. Slowly add the sour cream, combining well after each addition.
  6. Add the berries to the dry ingredients and toss just to combine.
  7. Add the wet mixture to the dry and fold until the batter comes together and the berries are evenly distributed.  Do not overmix.
  8. Divide the batter among the muffin cups and top with a sprinkling of pearl sugar.  Bake 25-30 minutes until the muffins are light golden brown and a pick inserted into the center comes out clean.

Sourdough Bread – Take 2

I made two more batch of sourdough on Saturday.  I have never had such great luck with a starter.  It’s just lovely.  I used the recipe from Emilie’s Sourdough Beginners Guide at the Clever Carrot again and the dough was beautiful.

I again tested my starter – it floated beautifully.  Then I and added filtered water, olive oil and flour called for (see the site linked above for the recipe).  I let that autolyse for 30 minutes and then added the salt (kosher). Every 30 minutes I pull the dough up and fold it over on itself.  Pull and fold four times – with a ninety degree turn of the bowl each time then cover it back up and wait.   The folding and turning happens during the first two hours, then it’s just a wait until the dough is about 150% of the original volume.

IMG_1392 IMG_1391I left for a few hours to pick up the milk at the dairy and when we returned, I put each batch into a vintage bread tin to proof.  I baked it at 400 degrees for 10 minutes and then I lowered the temperature to 400 degrees for another 25 minutes.

The side blew out because I didn’t score it deeply enough, but overall I am pretty happy with the results.

Sourdough Bread – Take 1

I finally decided that I needed to take the plunge and make a loaf of sourdough with my new starter.  I was a little anxious about it, but thanks to Emilie’s Sourdough Beginners Guide at the Clever Carrot I am feeling like I might be able to pull this off.

I tested my starter – it floated (a little?) and added some to the filtered water, olive oil and flour called for (see the site linked above for the recipe).  I let that autolyse for 30 minutes and then added the salt (grey fleur de see).  I’ve rigged up a little proofing area on the counter with a lamp and 60W bulb to see if I can warm things up a bit.

proofing SD2

Every 30 minutes I pull the dough up and fold it over on itself.  Pull and fold four times – with a ninety degree turn of the bowl each time then cover it back up and wait.  The folding and turning happens during the first two hours, then it’s just a long? wait until the dough is about 150% of the original volume.

I left it overnight in the refrigerator to proof.  It was puffy and lovely in the morning and  I left it until about the afternoon to bake.  I preheated the cloche to 450 degrees then side the dough in and popped on the cover.  It baked for 20 minutes and then I lowered the temperature to 400 degrees for another 20 minutes.  Lastly, I removed the top and cooked another 5 minutes.

IMG_1353 IMG_1354

 

Forgotten Skills – sourdough and butter

This afternoon I started a new sourdough culture, signed up for an online bagel class and cultured a quart of cream for butter……

I was gifted a dry San Francisco sourdough starter from a very nice man that lives near-by.  Today I combined it with 1 cup of warm spring water (85 degrees) and 1 cup of Bob’s Red Mill All-Purpose Flour.  I put it into a warm place (85 to 90 degrees – bottom drawer of a dresser that sits over a heat vent) for four hours. At the end of 4 hours I took off 1/2 cup of the mixture, which was doing nothing, and added another 1/4 cup of flour and 1/4 cup of warm water.  Now it’s back in the drawer, tucked in for the night.

IMG_1285

I finished up this evening by culturing a quart of cream with a creme fraiche culture to thicken it up for butter making tomorrow.  I just heated up the cream to 86 degrees, dissolved in the culture and now it’s resting on the counter until morning.IMG_1291

I also signed up for an online Bake the Best Bagels course on Udemy.  It’s taught by Teresa Greenway and was on a flash sale for $9.99.  It looks like it will be a lot of fun.Screen Shot 2016-01-09 at 9.49.26 PM